How To Celebrate Swedish Midsummer

Midsummer takes place in June and is a celebration of the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. It is one of the most celebrated holidays in Sweden. Singing and dancing around the Maypole is a tradition and eating good midsummer food is a must.

Midsummer is a two-day weekend. Midsummer eve 24th of June and Midsummer day 25th of June (2022). You celebrate on Midsummer eve. Swedish people may celebrate it differently but this is usually the same. In Swedish it’s called midsommarafton and midsommardagen.

What A Swedish Midsummer Can Look Like

Colorful tablecloths. Flowers in the hair.

A must for midsummer is the food. Although the food can look different on Swedish tables.

Grilling and desserts are the best parts. Grilling a fine piece of meat.

Then Strawberries and whip cream. Swedes love their strawberries!
If you’re in Sweden. Buy the strawberries early, because they can sell out!


Songs Swedish people know and sing on Midsummer(Eve) around the pole:

  • Små grodorna – LITTLE FROGS
  • Jungfru, jungfru – ROSY MAIDEN, MAIDEN
  • Enabärabuske – HERE WE GO ‘ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH
  • Rich Rach Fillibom bom bom
  • Morsgrisar är vi allihopa – WE ARE ALL MAMA’S KIDS
  • Vi äro musikanter – WE ARE MUSICIANS
  • Tre små gummor – THREE LITTLE OLD LADIES
  • Prästens lilla kråka – THE PRIEST’S LITTLE CROW

Also, check out our video dancing around midsummer poles (and all the songs).

Some Swedes may go to their own cabins, some are in their homes, and others may go to camping grounds with a camper or to a cabin.


If you travel to Sweden, definitely come here during the summer. Midsummer is the most special to see. July is usually the best weather.

Typical clothing in Swedish midsummer:
For women, a white dress or with a flower pattern.
You put on a blue or white shirt if you’re a man and nice pants to that.




Why is it called Midsummer?

It should really be the “start of summer”? Well, according to astronomically midsummer, that day is the longest period of daylight. After Midsummer, the daylight is getting shorter and shorter.


Thanks for reading. Come back soon for more!

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Check Out Our Swedish Midsummer Videos:



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